priceofliberty:

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops.

In which the NYPD’s attempt at “public relations” backfires tremendously.

bricksandmortarandchewinggum:

holdmypurse:

Remember when Romney lost the election so somebody created White People Mourning Romney and collected various people crying over Romney’s loss

Still so funny.

aristtaroxxx:

This was me at the strip club last night! Yeah you can see my nipples but I don’t really care right now.

aristtaroxxx:

This was me at the strip club last night! Yeah you can see my nipples but I don’t really care right now.

bembele2:

Yes, she has a twin sister..

kyssthis16:

Remember when Mitt Romney spoke at the NAACP National Convention

LEGENDARY

shitloadsofwrestling:

Eddie Guerrero and Vince McMahon [2004]
I’m not 100% sure, but I want to say this photo was taken after Eddie won the WWE Championship. Either way, this picture rules. Eddie talked in his book about how McMahon gave him another chance and another shot at life by re-accepting him into the WWE. When Guerrero became the WWE Champion, it wasn’t just an accomplishment of his career, it was a realization that he had officially conquered his demons. Eddie Guerrero is a true inspiration for anyone who isn’t where they want to be, and who’s willing to do anything it takes to get there.

shitloadsofwrestling:

Eddie Guerrero and Vince McMahon [2004]

I’m not 100% sure, but I want to say this photo was taken after Eddie won the WWE Championship. Either way, this picture rules. Eddie talked in his book about how McMahon gave him another chance and another shot at life by re-accepting him into the WWE. When Guerrero became the WWE Champion, it wasn’t just an accomplishment of his career, it was a realization that he had officially conquered his demons. Eddie Guerrero is a true inspiration for anyone who isn’t where they want to be, and who’s willing to do anything it takes to get there.

littlemissgoodhead:

i get wet so easily

gifdistrict:

Kendo match: Opponent disarmed

gifdistrict:

Kendo match: Opponent disarmed

hornyconfessionsplease:

Give you something to dream about…

hornyconfessionsplease:

Give you something to dream about…

jay-escobar:

rodaintshit:

YOOOOO

clever

jay-escobar:

rodaintshit:

YOOOOO

clever

jessieminx:

Happy cause I just came. Ha.

jessieminx:

Happy cause I just came. Ha.

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.